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Journal
2003 | 52 | 2-3 | 237-247
Article title

Łaskotanie mózgu. Co wiemy o śmiechu i humorze

Authors
Content
Title variants
EN
Brain tickling
Languages of publication
PL EN
Abstracts
EN
Summary Both humour and laughter have drawn human attention for centuries. The first part of this paper presents a review of different views and theories which support the view that laughter is not only a simple reaction to a amusing event. Only about 20% of human laughter can be linked with humour, while the remaining 80% occur because of tickling, nervousness, as an effect of drugs, when we play or simply because somebody else is laughing. Laughter, thanks to its structure and physiology, plays a very important role in creating social interactions. In the second part of the paper three major theories concerning humour have been described: superiority theories stating that humour is a social activity based on malice, hostility and agression, relief theories which perceive humour as a release of tension, and incongruity theories, where humour is the result of the resolution of incongruity. Finally, a review of recent studies on this subject is presented, with a special stress on the way humour is processed in the brain.
Keywords
Journal
Year
Volume
52
Issue
2-3
Pages
237-247
Physical description
Dates
published
2003
Contributors
author
  • Pracownia Percepcji Wzrokowej, Instytut Biologii Doświadczalnej im. M. Nenckiego, Pasteura 3, 02-093 Warszawa, Polska
References
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Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.bwnjournal-article-ksv52p237kz
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