PL EN


Preferences help
enabled [disable] Abstract
Number of results
2018 | 114 | 164-176
Article title

Reptiles diversity in Dimapur of North East India

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
The goal of this research is to collect and identify the specimens of reptiles that are found in and around Dimapur, Nagaland. As per the research the data on 12 specimens were collected belonging to snakes, lizards and tortoise. The research highlights the diversity and variety of the types of reptiles present in the Nagaland, and also the possibility of discovering many more. We strongly require intensive studies to document reptiles and other biota of the state. Conservation of biodiversity involving local communities would be the best possible option in Nagaland, as the forest area are largely owned by people. Geochelone elegans (Schoepff, 1795), Python molurus (Linnaeus, 1758), Python binittatus (Kuhl, 1820) and Cuora amboinesis (Daudin, 1802), a total of three species reported from the study area were found to be declared threatened by IUCN 3.1.
Discipline
Year
Volume
114
Pages
164-176
Physical description
Contributors
  • Department of Zoology, St. Joseph University Ikishe Model Village, Dimapur, Nagaland, 797115, India
  • Department of Zoology, St. Joseph University Ikishe Model Village, Dimapur, Nagaland, 797115, India
author
  • Department of Zoology, St. Joseph University Ikishe Model Village, Dimapur, Nagaland, 797115, India
author
  • Department of Zoology, St. Joseph University Ikishe Model Village, Dimapur, Nagaland, 797115, India
  • Department of Zoology, St. Joseph University Ikishe Model Village, Dimapur, Nagaland, 797115, India
  • Department of Zoology, St. Joseph University Ikishe Model Village, Dimapur, Nagaland, 797115, India
author
  • Department of Zoology, St. Joseph University Ikishe Model Village, Dimapur, Nagaland, 797115, India
author
  • Department of Zoology, St. Joseph University Ikishe Model Village, Dimapur, Nagaland, 797115, India
References
  • [1] Agasyan A. Zootoca vivipara. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version. 2. International Union for Conservation of Nature (2010).
  • [2] Ahmed MF, Das A, Dutta SK. Amphibians and Reptiles of Northeast India- A Photographic Guide. Aaranyak, Guwahati, India (2009).
  • [3] Annandale, Nelson. Contributions to Oriental Herpetology. Suppl. II. Notes on the Oriental lizards in the Indian Museum, with a list of the species recorded from British India and Ceylon. J. Proc. Asiatic Soc. Bengal, 1 (2) (1905) 81-93
  • [4] Ao JM, David PS, Bordoloi, Ohler A. Notes on a collection of snakes from Nagaland, Northeastern India, with 19 new records for this state. Russi. J. Herpet 11 (2) (2004) 155-162.
  • [5] Asana J. The natural history of Calotes versicolor, the common blood sucker. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 34 (1931) 1041-1047.
  • [6] Asian Turtle Trade Working Group (ATTWG). Cuora amboinensis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. (2000).
  • [7] Asian Turtle Trade Working Group, Geochelone elegans. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2016.3. International Union for Conservation of Nature (2014).
  • [8] Balakrishnan, Peroth Sajeev TV, Bindu TN. Artificial incubation, hatching and release of the Indian Rock Python Python molurus (Linnaeus, 1758), in Nilambur, Kerala. Reptile Rap 10 (2010) 24–27.
  • [9] Beolens B, Watkins M, Grayson M. Lampropholis guichenoti, in The Eponym Dictionary of Reptiles. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (2011).
  • [10] Bhupathy S, Nakro V, Azeez PA Strengthening community conservation efforts in Nagaland: A programme to impart technical support on biodiversity conservation and livelihood options. Final Report Submitted to Sir Dorabji Tata Trust, Mumbai (2012).
  • [11] Bhupathy S, Ramesh Kumar S, Paramanandham J, Thirumalainathan P, Pranjit Kumar. Sarma Conservation of reptiles in Nagaland, India, Bioresources and Traditional Knowledge of Northeast India, KL OFFSET Printers M. G. Road, Tuikhuahtlang, Aizawl 796001, India (2013)
  • [12] Buskirk, James R, Parham, James F, Feldman Chris R. On the hybridisation between two distantly related Asian turtles (Testudines: Sacalia × Mauremys). Salamandra. 46 (1/) (2005) 21–26.
  • [13] Das I. Turtles and Tortoises of India. WWFIndia/ Oxford University Press, Bombay (1995).
  • [14] Devasahayam S, and Anita Devasahayam. A peculiar food habit of the garden lizard Calotes versicolor(Daudin). J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. (1989) 86:253.
  • [15] Fritz Uwe, and Peter Havas, Checklist of Chelonians of the World (Vertebrate Zoology). 57 (2) (2007) 279. Archived from the original 17 December 2010. Retrieved 29 May 2012.
  • [16] Gopalakrishnakone and Chou PLM. Snakes of Medical Importance (Asia-Pacific Region). Singapore: Venom and Toxin Research Group National University of Singapore and International Society on Toxinology (Asia-Pacific section).(1990) pp. 284–285.
  • [17] Grismer L. Chan-Ard T. Calliophis bivirgata. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (2012)
  • [18] Jacobs HJ, Auliya M and Bohme W. On the taxonomy of the Burmese Python, Python molurus bivittatus KUHL, 1820, specifically on the Sulawesi population, Sauria. (2009), 31 (3): 5–11.
  • [19] Josef Friedrich Schmidtler and Wolfgang Boohme. Synonymy and nomenclatural history of the Common or Viviparous Lizard, by this time: Zootoca vivipara (Lichtenstein, 1823), Bonn Zoological Bulletin 60 (2) (2011) 214–228.
  • [20] Karunarathna DMS, Suranjan, Amarasinghe, AA Thasun. Notes on the territorial behaviour of Otocryptis wiegmanni Wagler, 1830 (Reptilia: Agamidae: Draconinae), Herpetotropicos. 4 (2) (2007) 79–83.
  • [21] Mazzotti FJ, Rochford M, Vinci J, Jeffery, BM, Eckles JK, Dove C, Sommers KP. Implications of the Python Challenge for Ecology and Management of Python molorus bivittatus (Burmese python) in Florida. Southeastern Naturalist 15(sp8) (2016) 63-74.
  • [22] Ota H and Whitaker AH. Hemidactylus frenatus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (2010)
  • [23] Otz RB, Mebs D, Hirche H Paar D. Hemostatic changes due to the venom gland extract of the red-necked keelback snake (Rhabdophis subminiatus) Toxicon (1991) 29 (12) 1501–1508.
  • [24] Smith MA. The Fauna of British India, Ceylon and Burma, including the whole of the Indo-Chinese subregion. Reptilia and Amphibia. Vol. II, Squamata. Taylor & Francis, London. (1935)
  • [25] Slowinski B, Boundy J and Lawson R. The phylogenetic relationships of Asian coral snakes (Elapidae: Calliophis and Maticora) based on morphological and molecular characters. Herpetologica 57(2) (2001) 233-245.
  • [26] Smith MA. The Fauna of British India, Ceylon Burma, including the whole of the Indo- Chinese subregion. Reptilia and Amphibia. Vol. III, Serpentes. Taylor & Francis, London. (1943).
  • [27] Stuart B, Nguyen TQ,Thy N, Grismer L, Chan-Ard T, Iskandar D, Golynsky E, Lau MWN. Python bivittatus, The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species IUCN. (2012).
  • [28] Whitaker R, A. Captain. Snakes of India – The Field Guide. Draco Books, Chennai. (2004)
  • [29] Wogan G and Chan-Ard T. Rhabdophis subminiatus, The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. (2012)
Document Type
article
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-fce74f8b-610f-483d-aed9-a10429c110c9
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.