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2019 | 135 | 202-213
Article title

Awareness of sexually transmitted infections in Poland

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EN
Abstracts
EN
Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) spread through sexual contact and can be responsible for many clinically significant complications, such as pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, ectopic pregnancy, fetal or neonatal death, premature delivery and increased susceptibility to HIV infection. Worldwide, millions of cases of STIs, such as chlamydia, syphilis or gonorrhoea occur every year, and hundreds of millions of people are currently infected. Some STIs can be cured following appropriate therapy. Others cannot be completely cured, but medicines can be used to manage symptoms and prevent ongoing transmission. According to the World Health Organization, STIs are one of the five types of diseases for which adults most commonly seek medical support worldwide. In this paper, we present the results of the analysis of data collected in Poland on the awareness of Polish society about sexually transmitted infections.
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Year
Volume
135
Pages
202-213
Physical description
Contributors
  • Department of Infectious Diseases and Hepatology, Medical University of Silesia, Bytom, Poland
  • Department of Infectious Diseases and Hepatology, Medical University of Silesia, Bytom, Poland
  • Department of Infectious Diseases and Hepatology, Medical University of Silesia, Bytom, Poland
  • Department of Infectious Diseases and Hepatology, Medical University of Silesia, Bytom, Poland
References
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Document Type
article
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bwmeta1.element.psjd-ebdc4a6b-1491-42f7-ba09-598c7ba0b039
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