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2020 | 147 | 166-178
Article title

Overview of Oceanic Eddies in Indonesia Seas Based on the Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Height

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Abstracts
EN
One of the complexities of the ocean currents in the territorial waters of Indonesia is oceanic eddies form. Ocean eddy is one of the very crucial phenomena in the ocean due to its circulation and connection with the chemical and biological aspects in the water column. This study aimed to observe the distribution of oceanic eddies associated with the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Sea Surface Height (SSH) with the Automatic Eddy Detection (AED) method. The analysis included distribution and types correlated with seasons. The results showed that eddies occur in all regions in the Indonesian Seas except the Java Sea. In general, the occurrence of eddies every month does not differ significantly for both Ocean Cyclonic Eddies (OCE) and Ocean Anticyclonic Eddies (OAE). The total oceanic eddies in a year are around 1,149 events. A minimum radius of the ocean eddies found was about 5.08 km, and a maximum was around 386.76 km. Furthermore, the occurrence of OCE is mostly in locations that are almost the same as OAE. Both types of eddy are mostly in locations with the boundary of temperatures and the boundary of SSH. Several eddies exist every month and mostly change or move into other areas. Eddies in Indonesia seas are influenced by differences of SST and different SSH that form ocean currents. One of the complexities of the ocean currents in the territorial waters of Indonesia is oceanic eddies form. Ocean eddy is one of the very crucial phenomena in the ocean due to its circulation and connection with the chemical and biological aspects in the water column. This study aimed to observe the distribution of oceanic eddies associated with the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Sea Surface Height (SSH) with the Automatic Eddy Detection (AED) method. The analysis included distribution and types correlated with seasons. The results showed that eddies occur in all regions in the Indonesian Seas except the Java Sea. In general, the occurrence of eddies every month does not differ significantly for both Ocean Cyclonic Eddies (OCE) and Ocean Anticyclonic Eddies (OAE). The total oceanic eddies in a year are around 1,149 events. A minimum radius of the ocean eddies found was about 5.08 km, and a maximum was around 386.76 km. Furthermore, the occurrence of OCE is mostly in locations that are almost the same as OAE. Both types of eddy are mostly in locations with the boundary of temperatures and the boundary of SSH. Several eddies exist every month and mostly change or move into other areas. Eddies in Indonesia seas are influenced by differences of SST and different SSH that form ocean currents.
Year
Volume
147
Pages
166-178
Physical description
Contributors
author
  • Department of Ocean Studies, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Science, University Padjadjaran, Jl. Raya Bandung-Sumedang Km. 21 West Java, Indonesia
author
  • Department of Ocean Studies, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Science, University Padjadjaran, Jl. Raya Bandung-Sumedang Km. 21 West Java, Indonesia
  • Department of Marine Science, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, Universitas Riau, Riau, Indonesia
  • Department of Marine Science, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Science, University Padjadjaran, Jl. Raya Bandung-Sumedang Km. 21 West Java, Indonesia
  • Department of Marine Science, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Science, University Padjadjaran, Jl. Raya Bandung-Sumedang Km. 21 West Java, Indonesia
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Document Type
article
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YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-dc2a53a3-20d5-4704-9aee-5f7b7e618ed5
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