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2017 | 66 | 56-74
Article title

Recent Scenario of Solid Waste Management in India

Content
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Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
Industrialization becomes very significant for developing countries like India having large number of population. Rapid increase in urbanization and per capita income lead to high rate of municipal solid waste generation. In recent times, E-waste and plastic waste also contribute considerably to total waste stream due to utilization of electronic and other items. These wastes may cause a potential hazard to human health or environment if any of the aspects of solid waste management is not managed effectively. In India, approach towards Solid waste management is still unscientific. Solid Waste collection efficiency in India is around 70% (Sharholy et al. 2007), while same is almost 100% in the developed countries. Even today, large portion of solid waste is dumped indiscriminately on outskirts of towns or cities without any prior treatment. This leads to groundwater contamination and increase in air pollution due to leachate percolation and release of gases respectively. Various study reveals that out of total solid waste, 80% can be utilized again either by recycling or reusing. Improper waste segregation and other factors lead recycling sector to work on outdated technology. However, plastic and paper recycling have been especially growing due to continuous increasing consumption of both the commodities. This study describes about current status of municipal solid waste management in different regions of India. It further summarizes a collective, systematic effort which improves implementation of legal frameworks, institutional arrangements, financial provisions, technology, operations management, human resource development, and public participation and awareness of Integrated SWM systems.
Year
Volume
66
Pages
56-74
Physical description
Contributors
  • Department of Health, Safety & Environmental Engineering, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun, India
  • Department of Health, Safety & Environmental Engineering, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun, India
  • Department of Health, Safety & Environmental Engineering, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun, India
  • Department of Electrical, Power & Energy, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun, India
References
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Document Type
article
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-bbb8c945-dfcb-4449-bb28-09cca98de565
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