PL EN


Preferences help
enabled [disable] Abstract
Number of results
2019 | 25 | 15-21
Article title

Antifungal efficiency of three traditional medicinal plants against Trichophyton rubrum

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
Cutaneous fungal infection are a wide-spread public health concern affecting millions of people all across the world. Nearly half of the affected will experience multiple episodes of infection requiring numerous rounds of treatment. Trichophyton rubrum was the most common etiological agent of dermatophytes, and it is emerging as an important and significantly prevalent infection in an increasingly aging population and immune-compromised patients. Development of more effective and less toxic anti-fungal agents is required for the treatment of dermatophytosis. The aim of the study was to evaluate the anti-fungal activity of extracts of three plant species used in traditional medicine against Trichophyton rubrum. The ethanol and water extracts of Eucalyptus globules, Croton macrostachyus, and Phytolacca dodecandra leaves were evaluated in vitro for anti-fungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum, using the agar well diffusion technique. The mean inhibition zone of both extracts for E. globulus, C. macrostachyus and P. dodecandra were 19.8, 20 and 16.3 mm, respectively, and mean inhibition zone of the ethanol and water extracts were 23 and 14.4 mm, respectively. Generally, mean inhibition zone of plant extracts did not show statistically significant difference among plants and the mean inhibition zone of plant extracts did show statistically significant difference between extracts (P ≤ 0.05). On the basis of the current findings, Eucalyptus globules and Croton macrostachyus could be good candidates in the search for new antifungal agents from natural products against Trichophyton rubrum. Therefore, further studies are needed to study their toxicology and isolate the bio- active components from these plants.
Discipline
Year
Volume
25
Pages
15-21
Physical description
Contributors
author
  • Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences, Debre Tabor University, Debre Tabor, Po.box 272, Ethiopia
  • Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences, Debre Tabor University, Debre Tabor, Po.box 272, Ethiopia
author
  • Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences, Debre Tabor University, Debre Tabor, Po.box 272, Ethiopia
author
  • Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences, Debre Tabor University, Debre Tabor, Po.box 272, Ethiopia
author
  • Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences, Debre Tabor University, Debre Tabor, Po.box 272, Ethiopia
  • Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences, Debre Tabor University, Debre Tabor, Po.box 272, Ethiopia
References
  • [1] Abyu Enyew, Zemede Asfaw, Ensermu Kelbessa and Raja Nagappan, Ethno-botanical study of traditional medicinal plants in & a Fiche District, Central Ethiopia. Current Research Journal of Biological Science 6(4) (2014) 154-167
  • [2] Adejumo, T. O. and Bamidele, B. S., Control of dermatophyte-causing agents (Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Trichophyton rubrum) using six medicinal plants. Journal of Medicinal Plants Research 3(11) (2009) 906-913
  • [3] Al-Bakri AG, Afifi FU. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of selected plant extracts by rapid XTT colorimetry and bacterial enumeration. J. Microbiol Meth. 68 (2007) 19-25
  • [4] Frey, D., Oldfield, R. J., & Bridger, R. C, A colour atlas of pathogenic fungi. Wolfe Medical Publications Ltd., Wolfe House, 3-5 Conway Street, London W1P 6HE (1979).
  • [5] Haley LD, Callaway CJ, Laboratory Methods in Medicinal Mycology. Fourth Ed. Centres for Disease Control, Atlanta (2000) 205-210.
  • [6] Hogewoning AA, Duijvestein M, Boakye D. Prevalence of symptomatic tinea capitis and associated causative organisms in the Greater Accra Region, Ghana. Br J. Dermatol. 2006; 154: 784-6.
  • [7] Irene, W. and Richard, C. S. The Dermatophytes. J. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 1995; 8: 240-259
  • [8] Ke-Qiang CAO, Ariena HC van Bruggen Inhibitory efficacy of several plant extracts and plant products on Phytophthora infestans. Journal of Agricultural University of Hebei (2001) 1-9.
  • [9] Kjell.B. Esser, Kassa Semagn, Legesse Wolde-Yohannes. Medicinal use and social status of the soap berry endod (Phytolacca dodecandra) in Ethiopia. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 85(2-3) (2003) 269-277
  • [10] Klaus Wolff, Richard Johnson, Arturo Saavedra. Fitzpatrick's Color Atlas and Synopsis of Clinical Dermatology, Seventh Edition (Color Atlas & Synopsis of Clinical Dermatology (Fitzpatrick)). McGraw-Hill Education / Medical; 7 edition (March 27, 2013)
  • [11] Luciene, M. C., Roseli, A., Claudia, M. L. and Nilce, M. M. In vitro antifungal drug susceptibilities of dermatophytes microconidia and arthroconidia. J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 2008; 62: 758-761
  • [12] Takahashi, R. Kokubo and M. Sakaino. Antimicrobial activities of eucalyptus leaf extracts and flavonoids from Eucalyptus maculata. Letters in Applied Microbiology 39 (1) (2004) 60-64
  • [13] Ramesh, N., Viswanathan, M., Saraswathy, A., Balakrishna, K., Brindha, P. and Lakshmanaperumalsami, P., Phytochemical and Antimicrobial Studies of Begonia malabarica. J. Ethnopharmacol, 79 (2002) 29-132
  • [14] Wayne, P. A. National committee for clinical laboratory standards. Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Disc Susceptibility Testing, 12 (2002) 01-53
Document Type
article
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-9c20a5f0-e4b4-4884-841a-e8cfca5a9845
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.