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2016 | 16 | 2 | 79-84
Article title

The need of neuropsychological assessment in daily care of patients without dementia

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PL
Potrzeba oceny neuropsychologicznej w codziennej opiece nad pacjentami bez zdiagnozowanej demencji
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Abstracts
EN
Aim of the study: The prevalence of cognitive impairment increases with age and features lesions observed in Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. The aim of the study was to determine whether individuals without diagnosed dementia are affected by any reduction of cognitive functioning and to what extent such reduction occurs. Material and methods: The study enrolled 156 individuals, including 110 aged <75 years and 46 aged ≥75 years. Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery was used in assessment of Motor Screening Task (Mean Latency and Mean Errors), Paired Associated Learning (Total Errors and Errors Shapes), Stocking of Cambridge (Mean Initial Thinking Time, Mean Subsequent Thinking Time, Problems Solved in Minimum Moves) and Graded Naming Test. Individuals who aborted tests were categorized as below the reference threshold. Results: Prevalence of results below the reference threshold were as follows: 8.97% in Motor Screening Task – Mean Latency, 57% in Paired Associated Learning – Total Errors, 57% in Paired Associated Learning – Errors Shapes, 30% in Stocking of Cambridge – Mean Initial Thinking Time, 28% in Stocking of Cambridge – Mean Subsequent Thinking Time, 57% in Stocking of Cambridge – Problems Solved in Minimum Moves and 32% in Graded Naming Test. The results of Motor Screening Task were above the threshold. Motor Screening Task – Mean Error was higher in the +75 group (p < 0.001), whereas the Motor Screening Task – Mean Latency did not differ between the groups. Also Paired Associated Learning outcomes were higher in the +75 group (p = 0.01). Graded Naming Test and Stocking of Cambridge – Mean Subsequent Thinking Time were lowered in the +75 group (p = 0.01), whereas other Stocking of Cambridge tests did not differ. The age ≥75 years was associated with 2.3 times higher risk of decreased Stocking of Cambridge – Mean Initial Thinking Time, 2.7 times higher risk of decreased Stocking of Cambridge – Mean Subsequent Thinking Time and 3.3 times higher risk of decreased Graded Naming Test. Conclusions: The link between cognitive functions and the age, despite the lack of diagnosis of dementia, confirms the need of neuropsychological assessment in patients without dementia.
PL
Cel: Rozpowszechnienie deficytów poznawczych w populacji wzrasta wraz z wiekiem. Wiąże się to ze zmianami obserwowanymi w chorobie Alzheimera, otępieniu naczyniopochodnym, chorobie Parkinsona i otępieniu z ciałami Lewy’ego. Celem badania było ustalenie, czy i w jakim stopniu osoby bez rozpoznanej demencji mają obniżone funkcjonowanie poznawcze. Materiał i metoda: Do badania włączono 156 osób, w tym 110 w wieku <75 lat i 46 w wieku ≥75 lat. Do oceny neuropsychologicznej wykorzystano testy metody Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB): Motor Screening Task (Mean Latency i Mean Errors), Paired Associated Learning (Total Errors i Errors Shapes), Stocking of Cambridge (Mean Initial Thinking Time, Mean Subsequent Thinking Time, Problems Solved in Minimum Moves) oraz Graded Naming Test. Osoby, które przerwały testy, zostały sklasyfikowane poniżej punktu referencyjnego. Wyniki: Odsetki wyników poniżej punktu referencyjnego były następujące: 8,97% w Motor Screening Task – Mean Latency, 57% w Paired Associated Learning – Total Errors, 57% w Paired Associated Learning – Errors Shapes, 30% w Stocking of Cambridge – Mean Initial Thinking Time, 28% w Stocking of Cambridge – Mean Subsequent Thinking Time, 57% w Stocking of Cambridge – Problems Solved in Minimum Moves oraz 32% w Graded Naming Test. Wyniki otrzymane w Motor Screening Task były powyżej punktu referencyjnego. Wyniki Motor Screening Task – Mean Error były wyższe w grupie osób ≥75. roku życia (p < 0,001), natomiast wyniki Motor Screening Task – Mean Latency nie różniły się istotnie pomiędzy grupami. Oba wyniki testu Paired Associated Learning były wyższe w grupie osób ≥75. roku życia (p = 0,01). Wyniki Graded Naming Test i Stocking of Cambridge – Mean Subsequent Thinking Time były obniżone w grupie osób >75. roku życia (p = 0,01), natomiast pozostałe wyniki Stocking of Cambridge nie różniły się między grupami. Wiek ≥75 lat był związany z 2,3 razy wyższym ryzykiem obniżonego wyniku w Stocking of Cambridge – Mean Initial Thinking Time, 2,7 razy wyższym ryzykiem obniżonego wyniku w Stocking of Cambridge – Mean Subsequent Thinking Time oraz 3,3 razy wyższym ryzykiem obniżonego wyniku w Graded Naming Test. Wnioski: Związek między funkcjami poznawczymi a wiekiem, mimo braku rozpoznania otępienia, potwierdza potrzebę oceny neuropsychologicznej pacjentów bez stwierdzonej demencji.
Discipline
Publisher

Year
Volume
16
Issue
2
Pages
79-84
Physical description
Contributors
  • Department of Medical Psychology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland
  • Department of Medical Psychology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland
  • Department of Old Age Psychiatry and Psychotic Disorders, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland
  • Department of Old Age Psychiatry and Psychotic Disorders, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland
author
  • Department of Medical Psychology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland
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article
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YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-94f59f16-6d0b-4863-b965-0852505f9645
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