PL EN


Preferences help
enabled [disable] Abstract
Number of results
2019 | 23 | 142-153
Article title

Survey of Road Kills in Two Major Routes of Kainji Lake National Park, Nigeria

Authors
Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
This research work centered on a survey of road kill along two major transportation routes to access the level of road fatality between the routes. A total number of ninety-five (95) questionnaires were administered – forty-eight (48) for park staff and security personnel and forty-seven (47) for road transport workers (kainji – lumma and kainji – ibbi) branch. The data was analyzed using table and simple percentage. Both routes had significant numbers of road kill - mostly reptiles (69% of the total). Our research also revealed that the wild animals were affected most by human habituation/feeding. Furthermore, 73% of the respondents believe that wildlife signage can be used to reduce rate of road mortality, while 27% choose road-warning signs. The study shows the need for proper mitigation measures and also for the application of modern methods of monitoring road activities and for managing wildlife habitats.
Year
Volume
23
Pages
142-153
Physical description
Contributors
author
  • Federal College of Wildlife Management, Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, P.M.B 268, New-Bussa, Nigeria
References
  • [1] Balkenhol, N. and L. P. Waits. (2009). Molecular road ecology: exploring the potential of genetics for investigating transportation impacts on wildlife. Molecular Ecology 18: 4151-4164.
  • [2] Benitez-Lopez, A., R. Alkemade, and P. A. Verweij. (2010). The impacts of roads and other infrastructure on mammal and bird populations: A meta-analysis. Biological Conservation 143: 1307-1316.
  • [3] Bennett, V. J., W. P. Smith, and M. G. Betts. (2011). Toward Understanding the Ecological Impact of Transportation Corridors. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station PNW-GTR-846.
  • [4] Coffin, A. W. (2007). From roadkill to road ecology: A review of the ecological effects of roads. Journal of Transport Geography 15: 396-406.
  • [5] Eigenbrod, F., S. J. Hecnar, and L. Fahrig. (2009). Quantifying the Road-Effect Zone: Threshold Effects of a Motorway on Anuran Populations in Ontario, Canada. Ecology and Society 14(1): 24
  • [6] Fahrig, L. and T. Rytwinski. (2009). Effects of Roads on Animal Abundance: an Empirical Review and Synthesis. Ecology and Society 14(1): 21.
  • [7] Forman, R. T. T. and L. E. Alexander. (1998). Roads and their major ecological effects. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 29: 207.
  • [8] Forman, R. T. T., D. Sperling, J. A. Bissonette, A. P. Clevenger, C. D. Cutshall, V. H. Dale, L. Fahrig, R. France, C. R. Goldman, K. Heanue, J. A. Jones, F. J. Swanson, T. Turrentine, and T. C. Winter. (2003). Road ecology: Science and Solutions Island Press.
  • [9] Gagnon, J. W., T. C. Theimer, N. L. Dodd, S. Boe, and R. E. Schweinsburg. (2007). Traffic volume alters elk distribution and highway crossings in Arizona. Journal of Wildlife Management 71: 2318-2323
  • [10] Jaeger, J. A. G., J. Bowman, J. Brennan, L. Fahrig, D. Bert, J. Bouchard, N. Charbonneau, K. Frank, B. Gruber, and K. T. von Toschanowitz. (2005). Predicting when animal populations are at risk from roads: An interactive model of road avoidance behavior. Ecological Modelling 185: 329-348.
  • [11] Jones. A.E. 2009). Major Wildlife Species in Kainji Lake National Park. Federal College of Wildlife Management, New-Bussa, Niger-State, Nigeria.
  • [12] Clair, C. C. (2003). Comparative permeability of roads, rivers, and meadows to songbirds in Banff National Park. Conservation Biology 17: 1151-1160.
  • [13] Trombulak, S. C. and C. A. Frissell. (2005). Review of ecological effects of roads on terrestrial and aquatic communities. Conservation Biology 14: 18-30.
  • [14] UNEP. (2001). Global methodology for mapping human impacts on the biosphere. Report
  • [15] Van Langevelde, F. and C. F. Jaarsma. 2004. Using traffic flow theory to model traffic mortality in mammals. Landscape Ecology 19: 895-907
Document Type
article
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-936a2791-36b0-4d99-8fe2-ad057849e646
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.