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2017 | 18 | 2 | 5-12
Article title

THE IMPORTANCE OF DIRECTLY DERIVED INFORMATION IN THE BASKETBALL JUMP SHOT. A COMPARISON OF CHANGED VISUAL CONDITIONS FROM DIFFERENT SHOOTING SPOTS

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EN
Abstracts
EN
The basketball jump shot as a movement, allowing visual feedback based corrections, can be considered as a generalized or a specialized motor skill. The purpose of this study is to look into the connection between visual perception and the specialization of a motor skill. Therefore, six male basketball players were asked to perform jump shots under different viewing conditions from their favourite spot (sweet spot) and a second, middle-distance spot. The question was, if performance is affected by the changed visual conditions and whether the shooting spot plays a role in a potentially change in performance. The different visual conditions were first, a regular basketball hoop with no adjustment, second a regular basketball hoop with a covered backboard, and third a regular basketball hoop with a covered rim. Between the different visual conditions, performance did not differ significantly, neither from the sweet spot, nor from the neutral defined spot. However, players showed a significantly better performance from sweet spot than from the neutral spot under regular viewing conditions.
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Year
Volume
18
Issue
2
Pages
5-12
Physical description
Contributors
author
  • University of Hildesheim, Institute of Sport Science, Germany
author
  • University of Hildesheim, Institute of Sport Science, Germany
author
  • University of Hildesheim, Institute of Sport Science, Germany
References
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Document Type
article
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YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-87d369a7-f593-438a-a613-7b3f4898a70b
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