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2016 | 47 | 2 | 230-240
Article title

Comparison of the Optical Image of the Solar Prominence with the Formation of Solar Radio Burst Type III on 3rd September 2015

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EN
Abstracts
EN
Solar radio burst in the range of 220 - 400 MHz have been correlated with the optical solar prominence phenomena covering the presence sunspot minimum. In combination of the observation in radio emission and the basis of this study, the occurrence of the event has been proposed. The active region of the prominence was AR2407. An individual type III burst was observed at 08:21 UT. The burst lasts for 20 seconds with a drift rate of 4.25 MHz/s. This burst was recorded by the Compound Astronomical Low-cost Low-frequency Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatory (CALLISTO) at Switzerland. The CALLISTO spectrometer is a spectrometer system that has been installed all around the world to observe the activity of the sun for 24 hours. The activation may be caused by shock waves issuing from prominences and solar flares. The loop prominences can be observed by using the optical telescope and is the initiates points of the following important flare that exist for 6 hours. The active region on the Sun experience the gradual build up of the magnetic field which gives rise to the sunspots, prominences and loops in the corona and produce the powerful outburst explosions.
Year
Volume
47
Issue
2
Pages
230-240
Physical description
Contributors
author
  • School of Physics and Material Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, MARA University of Technology, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia, zetysh@salam.uitm.edu.my
author
  • School of Physics and Material Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, MARA University of Technology, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia
  • Kompleks Baitul Hilal Telok Kemang, Lot 4506 Batu 8, Jalan Pantai, 5, Tanjung Tanah Merah, 71050, Port Dickson, Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia
author
  • School of Physics and Material Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, MARA University of Technology, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia
author
  • School of Physics and Material Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, MARA University of Technology, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia
author
  • School of Physics and Material Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, MARA University of Technology, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia
author
  • School of Physics and Material Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, MARA University of Technology, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia
  • Langkawi National Observatory, National Space Agency (ANGKASA), Empangan Bukit Malut 07000, Langkawi, Kedah, Malaysia
  • Langkawi National Observatory, National Space Agency (ANGKASA), Empangan Bukit Malut 07000, Langkawi, Kedah, Malaysia
author
  • Institute of Astronomy, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, Building HIT, Floor J, CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland
  • Academy of Contemporary Islamic Studies (ACIS), MARA University of Technology, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia
References
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  • [2] Hamidi, Z., et al., Theoretical Review of Solar Radio Burst III (SRBT III) Associated With of Solar Flare Phenomena. International Journal of Fundamental Physical Sciences, 2013. 3: p. 20-23.
  • [3] Hamidi, Z. and N. Shariff, The Propagation of An Impulsive Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) due to the High Solar Flares and Moreton Waves. International Letters of Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy, 2014. 14(1): p. 118.
  • [4] Hamidi, Z., N. Shariff, and C. Monstein, First Light Detection of A Single Solar Radio Burst Type III Due To Solar Flare Event. International Letters of Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy, 2014. 11(1): p. 51.
  • [5] McLean, D.J. and N.R. Labrum, Solar radiophysics: Studies of emission from the sun at metre wavelengths. 1985.
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  • [8] Hamidi, Z.S., Probability of Solar Flares Turn Out to Form a Coronal Mass Ejections Events Due to the Characterization of Solar Radio Burst Type II and III. International Letters of Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy, 2014. 16: p. 2.
  • [9] Melrose, D., On the theory of type II and type III solar radio bursts. II. Alternative model. Australian Journal of Physics, 1970. 23(5): p. 885-904.
  • [10] Melrose, D., A solar flare model based on magnetic reconnection between current-carrying loops. The Astrophysical Journal, 1997. 486(1): p. 521.
  • [11] Hamidi, Z., et al. Dynamical structure of solar radio burst type III as evidence of energy of solar flares. in American Institute of Physics Conference Series. 2013.
  • [12] Hamidi, Z., et al., The Beginning Impulsive of Solar Burst Type IV Radio Emission Detection Associated with M Type Solar Flare. International Journal of Fundamental Physical Sciences, 2012. 2: p. 32-34.
  • [13] Hamidi, Z., N. Shariff, and C. Monstein, An Observation of an Inverted Type U Solar Burst Due to AR1429 Active Region. International Letters of Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy, 2014. 10: p. 81.
  • [14] Hamidi, Z., et al., Signal Detection Performed by Log Periodic Dipole Antenna (LPDA) in Solar Monitoring. International Journal of Fundamental Physical Sciences, 2012. 2: p. 32-34.
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  • [16] Hamidia, Z., et al. Observations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at low frequency radio region on 15th April 2012. in AIP Conf. Proc. 2013.
Document Type
article
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YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-6e28d2ec-3c33-4f62-846c-6482e8d5bf4b
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