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2018 | 92 | 2 | 309-326
Article title

Antimicrobial Activity of Stem, Leave and Root Plant Extract of Sclerocarya birrea and Sterculia setigera against Some Selected Microorganisms

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Abstracts
EN
Plant extracts have been used widely with and without chemical modification for various infectious diseases cause by bacterial activities. All the methanolic plant extract of Sclerocarya birrea showed anti-microbial activities against most of the test organism with some showing a better antibacterial and antifungal activities than others. The leave from Kem has the minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration of 50 mg/ml for E. coli, 100 mg/ml for C. albican and S. aureus but A. niger has 200 mg/ml whereas on the other hand from Yola S. aureus, C. albican, A. niger and E. coli has 100 mg/ml. The stem has the minimum bactericidal and fungicidal concentration of 50 mg/ml for E. coli, S. aureus and 100 mg/ml for C. albican and A. niger and on the other hand from Yola has 100 mg/ml for E. coli, S. aureus and 200 mg/ml for C. albican and A. niger. The roots from Kem has 50 mg/ml for E. coli and S. aureus and 100 mg/ml for C. albican and A. niger and from Yola has 100 mg/ml for E. coli, S. aureus, C. albican and A. niger has 200 mg/ml. This shows that the stem and roots of Sterculia Setigera is more sensitive to the tested organism and is bactericidal at low concentration. The leaves extract in both locations has the MIC of 50 mg/ml for E. coli, S. aureus and C. albican but 100 mg/ml for A. niger. The stem extract from Kem has the MIC of 25 mg/ml for bacteria and 50 mg/ml for fungi and on the other hand from Yola, the extract has MIC of 50 mg/ml for E. coli, S. aureus and C. albican but 100 mg/ml for A. niger. The root showed different minimum inhibitory concentration from Kem, the extract has 25 mg/ml for bacteria and 50 mg/ml for fungi. On the other hand, the extract from Yola has 50 mg/ml for bacteria and 100 mg/ml for fungi. Finally, the limit of detection for both plants collected from two different geographical areas for inhibitory effect has been measured successfully.
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Discipline
Year
Volume
92
Issue
2
Pages
309-326
Physical description
Contributors
author
  • Physical/Theoretical Chemistry Research Unit, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Calabar, Nigeria
author
  • Department of Chemistry, Modibbo Adama University of Technology, Yola, Adamawa State, Nigeria
author
  • Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhejiang, China
author
  • Department of Chemistry, Modibbo Adama University of Technology, Yola, Adamawa State, Nigeria
author
  • Department of Chemistry, Modibbo Adama University of Technology, Yola, Adamawa State, Nigeria
author
  • Physical/Theoretical Chemistry Research Unit, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Calabar, Nigeria
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article
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bwmeta1.element.psjd-60932ffb-3c13-4e57-9ea9-9994eb9fff8e
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