PL EN


Preferences help
enabled [disable] Abstract
Number of results
2019 | 26 | 157-166
Article title

Effect of Using Fermented Lemna sp. in Fish Feed on Growth Rate of Nilem Carp (Osteochilus hasselti)

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
This research aims to determine the highest level of fermented Lemna sp. used in artficial feed to produce optimum growth rate of Nilem Carp. This research was conducted from March to July 2016, in the Ciparanje Laboratory and Aquaculture Laboratory of the Fisheries and Marine Science Faculty, Universitas Padjadjaran. The method used in this research is experimental, and is of a Completely Randomized Design (CRD). It consists of five treatments and three repetitions, providing one commercial diet (as control) and four fermented Lemna sp. levels (10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Collected data are analyzed with analysis of variance F-test at 95% confidence level. The parameters observed in this research are divided into four sub-parameters: nutrition changes of fermented Lemna sp., daily growth rate, feed conversion ratio and survival rate. The crude fiber content of Lemna sp. was reduced from 18.37% to 13.57%, and protein content increased from 19.37% to 23.47%, respectively, after fermentation. Based on the results of this research, fermented Lemna sp. used in fish feed at 40% level produced the best results: a daily growth rate at 0.75%, a feed conversion ratio at 3.61 and a survival rate of up to 100%.
Year
Volume
26
Pages
157-166
Physical description
Contributors
  • Departement of Fisheries, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, University of Padjadjaran, Jatinangor 45363, West Java, Indonesia
author
  • Departement of Fisheries, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, University of Padjadjaran, Jatinangor 45363, West Java, Indonesia
author
  • Departement of Fisheries, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, University of Padjadjaran, Jatinangor 45363, West Java, Indonesia
author
  • Departement of Fisheries, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, University of Padjadjaran, Jatinangor 45363, West Java, Indonesia
  • Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, University of Padjadjaran, Jatinangor 45363, West Java, Indonesia
References
  • [1] Dossou S, Koshio S, Ishikawa M, Yokoyama S , Dawood M.A.O, El Basuini M.F, El-Hais A.M, and Olivier A. 2018. Effect of partial replacement of fish meal by fermented rapeseed meal on growth, immune response and oxidative condition of red sea bream juvenile, Pagrus major. Aquaculture. 490: 228-235.
  • [2] Kim H.S. and Cho, S.H. 2019. Dietary inclusion effect of feed ingredients showing high feeding attractiveness to rockfish (Sebastes schlegeli Hilgendorf 1880) on the growth performance, feed utilization, condition factor and whole body composition of fish (II). Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology. 231: 66-73.
  • [3] Bardach, J. E., Ryther, J. H., McLarney, W. D. 1972. Aquaculture: the farming and husbandry of freshwater and marine organisms. Wiley-Interscience, New York.
  • [4] Andriani Y, Irawan B, Iskandar, Zidni I, and Partasasmita R. 2019. Short Communication: Diversity of duckweed (Araceae-Lemnoideae), morphological characteristics and its potentials as food sources for herbivorous fishes in West Java, Indonesia. Biodiversitas Volume 20, Number 6, 1617-1623
  • [5] Landesman, L, N. C. Parker, C. B. Fedler, and M. Konikof. 2005. Modeling duckweed growth in wastewater treatment systems. Livestock Research for Rural Development, 17 (6)
  • [6] Ansal M.D., Dhawan A, Kaur VI. 2010. Duckweed based bio-remediation of village ponds: An ecologically and economically viable integrated approach for rural development through aquaculture. Livestock Research for Rural Development. 22: 7.
  • [7] Azer SA. 2013. Taxonomic revision of genus Lemna (Lemnaceae Gray) in Egypt. Annals Agri Sci 58(2): 257-263.
  • [8] Ceschin S, Abati S, Leacche I, Zuccarello V. 2018. Ecological comparison between duckweeds in Central Italy: the invasive Lemna minutavs. the native L. minor. Plant Biosyst 152(4): 674-683.
  • [9] Ceschin S, Della Bella V, Piccari F, Abati S, 2016. Colonization dynamics of the alien macrophyte Lemna minutaKunth: a case study froma semi-natural pond in Appia Antica Regional Park(Rome, Italy). Fund Appl Limnol 188(2):93-101
  • [10] Aslam S, and Zuberi A. 2017.Effect of duckweed by replacing soybean in fish feed on growth performance of Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) and Silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix). Int J Fish Aquat Stud 5: 278-282.
  • [11] Nopriani, U., Karti P.D.M.H, Prihantoro, I. 2014. Productivity of duckweed (Lemna minor) as alternative forage feed for livestock in different light intensities. JITV 19(4): 272-286.
  • [12] Mohapatra SB. 2015. Utilization of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) meal as partial fish protein replacement in the diet of Cyprinus carpiofry. Eur J Exper Biol 5: 31-36
  • [13] Watanabe, T. 1988. Fish Nutrition and Marine Culture. JICA Texbook. The General of Aquaculture Course. Departemen of Aquatic. Biosciense. Pp. 238.
  • [14] Ogunji, J., Toor, R.U.A.S., Schulz, C. and Kloas, W. 2008. Growth Performance, Nutrient Utilization of Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus Fed Housefly Maggot Meal (Magmeal) Diets. Turkish Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. 8 (1) : 141-147.
  • [15] Estrada G.T, Mijangos L.M.R, Romero L.A.M, González D.N.T, Salem A.Z, Mlambo V, Cuellar S.E.M, Reyes M.G, and Pleigo A.B. Potential impacts of dietary Lemna gibba supplements in a simulated ruminal fermentation system and environmental biogas production. Journal of Cleaner Production. 181: 555-561.
  • [16] Poedjiadi, A. 2006. Dasar – Dasar Biokimia. Edisi Revisi. Jakarta: UI - Press.
  • [17] Ali S, and Kaviraz A. 2018. Aquatic weed Ipomoea aquatica as feed ingredient for rearing Rohu, Labeo rohita (Hamilton). The Egyptian Journal of Aquatic Research. 44 (4): 321-325.
  • [18] Pagarra, H. 2010. Pengaruh Lama Fermentasi dengan Ragi Tape Terhadap Kadar Glukosa pada Umbi Gadung (Disocorea hispida DENNST). Bionature Vol. 11 (1): p. 7-13
  • [19] Limbu S.M. 2019. The effects of on-farm produced feeds on growth, survival, yield and feed cost of juvenile African sharptooth catfish (Clarias gariepinus). Aquaculture and Fisheries. 1-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aaf.2019.07.002
  • [20] Omasaki S.K, Janssen K, Besson M, Komen H. Economic values of growth rate, feed intake, feed conversion ratio, mortalityand uniformity for Nile tilapia. Aquaculture. 481: 124-132.
  • [21] Katopodis C, Cai Lu, and Johnson D. 2019.Sturgeon survival: The role of swimming performance and fish passage research. Fisheries Research. 212: 162-171.
  • [22] Fu C, Cui Y.L, Xu J.J, Wang Y, and Fu S.J. 2019. A study on the physiological and behavioral mechanisms underlying the differences in survival capacity between two cyprinid fish species. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology. 231: 74-81.
  • [23] Cuesta,A., Carrion, R.L., Martin del Rio, M.P., Meseguer, J., Mancera, J.M., Esteban,M.A., 2005. Salinity influences the humoral immune parameters of gilthead seabream(Sparus aurataL.). Fish Shellfish Immunol. 18, 255–261.
  • [24] Saravanan M, Ramesh M, Petkam M, and Poopal R.K. 2019. Influence of environmental salinity and cortisol pretreatment on gill Na+/K+−ATPase activity and survival and growth rates in Cyprinus carpio. Aquaculture Reports. 11: 1-7.
Document Type
article
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-4692eebd-265c-44ca-81de-52011d68934d
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.