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2017 | 78 | 335-341
Article title

Military potential of Great Britain

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EN
Abstracts
EN
Military security is a concept within a system of domains, types, sectors of national security (state security). This term defines a process that involves a variety of activities, a variety of measures aimed at counteracting external and internal threats that may endanger the use of military force to violate the territory and limit the sovereignty of the state, maintaining the capacity to oppose the use of military force. At the same time, this is a state of organized defense against these threats. Military security is a process that involves a variety of activities and measures aimed at counteracting external and internal threats. They may endanger the use of military force to violate the territory and limit the sovereignty of the state, maintaining the capacity to oppose the use of military force. At the same time, this is a state of organized defense against these threats [1].
Year
Volume
78
Pages
335-341
Physical description
References
  • [1] Duncanson, Claire. Forces for good? Narratives of military masculinity in peacekeeping operations. International Feminist Journal of Politics 11.1 (2009) 63-80. Armed Forces Act 1976, Arrangement of Sections, raf.mod.uk
  • [2] Higate, Paul. Cowboys and professionals: The politics of identity work in the private and military security company. Millennium 40.2 (2012) 321-341. The Mission of the Armed Forces, armedforces.co.uk
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  • [9] S. J. Lee (1996), Aspects of British Political History 1914-1995, London p. 273
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  • [11] Hack (2000), Defence and Decolonisation in South-East Asia: Britain, Malaya, Singapore, 1941-1968, Oxford University Press, p. 285
  • [12] Sparrow, Robert. Building a better War Bot: Ethical issues in the design of unmanned systems for military applications. Science and Engineering Ethics 15.2 (2009) 169-187
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Document Type
article
Publication order reference
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-466196de-71d8-4545-86d5-4e5cda8ed7c3
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