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2017 | 66 | 225-237
Article title

Self-esteem: An Evolutionary-Developmental Approach

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While the research literature is replete with studies focusing on the developmental factors that affect self-esteem, little attention has been paid to the source or functions of the self-esteem motive itself. The present paper aims at exploring some ways in which an evolutionary-developmental-psychological (EDP) perspective can explain the adaptive nature of self-esteem. This paper attempts to address some important issues that are the focus of evolutionary psychology, including, possible evolutionary functions of self-esteem, by focusing on two theories namely, the Terror Management Theory (TMT) and the Sociometer Theory. Additionally, this review also attempts to identify some of the links between self-esteem and social relationships using an evolutionary-developmental-psychological (EDP) framework.
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66
Pages
225-237
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  • Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, College of Psychology, Nova Southeastern University, 3301 College Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33314, USA, madhavi@nova.edu
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Document Type
article
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YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-39d5fc87-b6e6-41e1-a05f-041400515c85
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