PL EN


Preferences help
enabled [disable] Abstract
Number of results
2015 | 11 | 92-104
Article title

The threat from North Korea

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
North Korea’s satellite launch last December and its detonation in February of a third nuclear device occurred in blatant defiance of multiple UN Security Council resolutions prohibiting such activities. Condemnation of these actions by the international community nonetheless precipitated a flurry of particularly strident North Korean threats against the United States and South Korea. These threats were actually hollow, but they provoked a billion-dollar strategic missile defense deployment decision and spawned calls by U.S. pundits and politicians for preventive attacks on North Korea. Although the intensity of the crisis is now waning, North Korea’s pursuit of nuclear and missile capabilities continues, and its political isolation from the international community deepens. It is high time to sort out the nature of the threat and reconsider what can be done about it.
Keywords
Year
Volume
11
Pages
92-104
Physical description
Contributors
  • Department of Commerce, Osmania University PG College Nalgonda, Andhra Pradesh, India, lami.s@invertis.org
author
  • Department of Commerce, Osmania University PG College Nalgonda, Andhra Pradesh, India
  • Department of Commerce, Osmania University PG College Nalgonda, Andhra Pradesh, India
References
  • [1] Andray Abrahamian, ‘Pyongyang stretches deterrence limits’, Asia Times, December 8, 2010, http://www.atimes.com/atimes/printN.html; Donald Kirk, ‘North Korean shells aim to shock’, Asia Times, November 24, 2010, http://www.atimes.com/atimes/printN.html
  • [2] Charles Armstrong, The North Korean Revolution, 1945-1950, Cornell University Press, Ithaca and London, 2003; Bradley K. Martin, Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader: North Korea and the Kim Dynasty, Thomas Dunne Books, New York, 2006; Willy Lam, ‘Beijing won’t rein in reckless neighbour’, Asia Times, December 9, 2010, http://www.atimes.com/atimes/printN.html
  • [3] Carl Ungerer and Simon Smith, ‘Australia and South Korea: Middle power cooperation and Asian security’, p. 11; Peter Lee, ‘Dear Leader’s designs on Uncle Sam’; Willy Lam, ‘Beijing won’t rein in reckless neighbour’.
  • [4] Office of the Secretary of Defense, “Military and Security Developments Involving the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,” 2013, p. 3, http://www.defense.gov/pubs/Reportto CongressonMilitaryandSecurityDevelopmentsInvolvingtheDPRK.pdf.
  • [5] Choe Sang-Hun, “North Korea Moves Missile to Coast, but Little Threat Is Seen,” The New York Times, April 4, 2013.
  • [6] David Albright and Christina Walrond, “North Korea’s Estimated Stocks of Plutonium and Weapon-Grade Uranium,” Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS), August 16, 2012, http:// isis-online.org/uploads/isis-reports/documents/dprk_fissile_material_ production_16Aug2012.pdf.
  • [7] Greg Thielmann, “How to Read the North Korean Nuclear Missile Threat,” Arms Control Now, April 13, 2013, http://armscontrolnow. org/2013/04/12/how-to-read-the-north-korean-nuclear-missile-threat/.
  • [8] Peter Lee, ‘Dear Leader’s designs on Uncle Sam’, Asia Times, December 4, 2010, http://www.atimes.com/atimes/printN.html; Willy Lam, ‘Beijing won’t rein in reckless neighbour’; Donald Kirk, ‘North Korean shells aim to shock’; Adrian Buzo, The Guerrilla Dynasty: Politics and Leadership in North Korea, Allen and Unwin, St. Leonards, 1999; Andrei Lankov, ‘Changing North Korea: An Information Campaign Can Beat the Regime’, Foreign Affairs, 88, 6, November/December 2009, pp. 95-105.
  • [9] “N. Korea Has ‘No Nuclear Warhead’ to Fit Missile,” AFP, May 15, 2013
  • [10] Office of the Secretary of Defense, “Military and Security Developments Involving the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,” p. 9. 9. Thomas B. Cochran et al., Nuclear Weapons Databook, Vol. 4: Soviet Nuclear Weapons (Cambridge, MA: Ballinger, 1988). 10. Markus Schiller, “Characterizing the North Korean Nuclear Missile Threat,” RAND Corp., 2012, p. 87.
  • [11] Office of the Secretary of Defense, “Military and Security Developments Involving the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,” p. 15.
  • [12] John Barry, “The Defense Secretary’s Exit Interview,” The Daily Beast, June 21, 2011, http://www.thedailybeast.com/ articles/2011/06/21/robert-gates-interview-his-lingering-concernsabout-u-s-supremacy-nuclear-proliferation-and-more.html.
  • [13] The US and North Korea negotiated and signed the 1994 Agreed Framework in the wake of the first North Korean nuclear crisis in 1993-94. Under the terms of the Agreed Framework, the US, South Korea and Japan agreed to supply energy and fuel aid to North Korea. In turn, Pyongyang agreed to freeze its nuclear program and to allow IAEA inspections of its nuclear facilities. Neither side fully abided by the terms of the agreement which ended in October 2002 when the North Koreans confirmed they had surreptitiously continued with their nuclear program and would no longer allow IAEA inspections. This precipitated the second North Korean nuclear crisis.
  • [14] Andray Abrahamian, ‘Pyongyang stretches deterrence limits’; Carl Ungerer and Simon Smith, ‘Australia and South Korea: Middle power cooperation and Asian security’, pp. 10-11
Document Type
article
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-34ee7406-758f-4718-9f81-971222633d89
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.