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Number of results
2017 | 74 | 36-52
Article title

Effect of Bike Lane Infrastructure on Ridership

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
This study addresses the use of non-motorized transportation. The global benefits of the bike paths, bike lanes, and other types of bicycle-specific infrastructure consist of a reduction in traffic congestion and a decrease in emissions of greenhouse gasses and other pollutants that commuters face today. Additional indirect benefits, of no less value, demonstrate the benefits and viability of bicycles and non-motorized transport. These findings suggest that lack of pollutions and low cost of this form of transport for commuting will encourage the adoption and development of similar facilities elsewhere around the world.
Year
Volume
74
Pages
36-52
Physical description
References
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Document Type
article
Publication order reference
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-273bf2c4-abc6-4dc3-803d-fe94c328b992
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