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2018 | 92 | 2 | 260-271
Article title

Concentration of heavy metals in the soil and translocation with phytoremediation potential by plant species in military shooting range

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Abstracts
EN
Concentration of seven (7) metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Mu, Ni, Cr, and Cd) in the samples of soil and some plant species collected from Kachia military shooting range were determined. The mineral ions were assayed using the acid digestion method and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Physicochemical parameters (pH, EC, Bulk density, water holding capacity and Total Nitrogen) of the soil samples were also determined. Of the 7 metals determined in the soils samples, the concentration of Pb (14.85 ± 6.78 mg/kg-1) was the highest compared to the concentrations of other metals. Physicochemical parameters were within the range that allows effective phytoremediation. Cu showed the lowest concentration (0.55 ± 1.68 mg/kg-1). Ni was below the detectable limit in most of the samples. Similarly, concentrations of Pb (12.30 mg/kg-1) in the shoot of Albizia zygia among other metals were higher than those of the other metals in the plant tissues. Concentration of Cd (0.07 mg/kg-1) in the root of Eragotis tremula was the lowest. Generally, metal ion concentration in the soil and plant samples of the shooting range (polluted site) significantly) differed from those of the non-polluted site (P<0.05). Combretum hispidium among the plant species had the highest translocation factor (TF = 2.91). Although the TF was higher in the plant of the polluted site TF >1), reasonable amount of them were retained within the underground tissues (roots).
Year
Volume
92
Issue
2
Pages
260-271
Physical description
Contributors
author
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Nigerian Defence Academy, P.M.B. 2109 Kaduna, Nigeria
author
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Nigerian Defence Academy, P.M.B. 2109 Kaduna, Nigeria
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Nigerian Defence Academy, P.M.B. 2109 Kaduna, Nigeria
author
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Nigerian Defence Academy, P.M.B. 2109 Kaduna, Nigeria
author
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Nigerian Defence Academy, P.M.B. 2109 Kaduna, Nigeria
author
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Nigerian Defence Academy, P.M.B. 2109 Kaduna, Nigeria
author
  • Department of Chemistry, Nigerian Defence Academy, P.M.B. 2109 Kaduna, Nigeria
author
  • Department of Forestry Technology, Federal College of Forestry Mechanization, P.M.B. 2273 Afaka Kaduna, Nigeria
References
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article
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YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-1604997e-92b0-41ec-98f8-bf4d420f2319
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