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2014 | 31 | 4 | 271-276
Article title

DELAYED URIC ACID ACCUMULATION IN PLASMA PROVIDES ADDITIONAL ANTIOXIDANT PROTECTION AGAINST IRONTRIGGERED OXIDATIVE STRESS AFTER A WINGATE TEST

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Abstracts
EN
Reactive oxygen species are produced during anaerobic exercise mostly by Fe ions released into plasma and endothelial/muscle xanthine oxidase activation that generates uric acid (UA) as the endpoint metabolite. Paradoxically, UA is considered a major antioxidant by virtue of being able to chelate pro-oxidative iron ions. This work aimed to evaluate the relationship between UA and plasma markers of oxidative stress following the exhaustive Wingate test. Plasma samples of 17 male undergraduate students were collected before, 5 and 60 min after maximal anaerobic effort for the measurement of total iron, haem iron, UA, ferric-reducing antioxidant activity in plasma (FRAP), and malondialdehyde (MDA, biomarker of lipoperoxidation). Iron and FRAP showed similar kinetics in plasma, demonstrating an adequate pro-/antioxidant balance immediately after exercise and during the recovery period (5-60 min). Slight variations of haem iron concentrations did not support a relevant contribution of rhabdomyolysis or haemolysis for iron overload following exercise. UA concentration did not vary immediately after exercise but rather increased 29% during the recovery period. Unaltered MDA levels were concomitantly measured. We propose that delayed UA accumulation in plasma is an auxiliary antioxidant response to post-exercise (ironmediated) oxidative stress, and the high correlation between total UA and FRAP in plasma (R-Square = 0.636; p = 0.00582) supports this hypothesis.
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Year
Volume
31
Issue
4
Pages
271-276
Physical description
Dates
published
2014
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author
author
author
author
References
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Document Type
article
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-0860-021X-2014-31-4-386
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