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2019 | 125 | 139-158
Article title

Teaching lingua franca English – teaching the impossible

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EN
Abstracts
EN
The paper discusses the use of English as a lingua franca (ELF), in pedagogical activities in the language class. On the basis of the didactic approach called CLT (Communicative Language Teaching it was pointed out that the treatment of learning a foreign language as a lingua franca rather than as a foreign language sensu stricto may be an effective aid for a student (and often a teacher) in their collaborative efforts leading to effective L2 learning.
Year
Volume
125
Pages
139-158
Physical description
Contributors
  • Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Bielsko-Biala, 2 Willowa Str., 43-300 Bielsko-Biała, Poland
  • Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Bielsko-Biala, 2 Willowa Str., 43-300 Bielsko-Biała, Poland
References
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Document Type
article
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.psjd-02e26b50-4863-4935-9323-bcba50fc5665
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