PL EN


Preferences help
enabled [disable] Abstract
Number of results
2000 | 48 | 5 | 429-435
Article title

The role of T cells in rheumatoid arthritis

Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), T cells infiltrate into the synovial membrane where they initiate and maintain activation of macrophages and synovial fibroblasts, transforming them into tissue-destructive effector cells. The diversity of the disease process and the formation of complex lymphoid microstructures indicates that multiple T cell activation pathways are involved. This model is supported by the association of distinct disease patterns with different variants and combinations of HLA class II molecules. T cell pathology in RA, however, is not limited to the joint. Affected patients have major abnormalities in the T cell pool with a marked contraction in T cell receptor diversity and an outgrowth of large clonal populations. Clonally expanded CD4+ T cells lose expression of the CD28 molecule and gain expression of perforin and granzyme. Consequently, the functional profile of expanded CD4+CD28null T cells is fundamentally changed and is shifted towards tissue-injurious capabilities. CD4+CD28null T cells are particularly important in patients with extraarticular manifestations of RA, where they may have a direct role in vascular injury. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the loss of T cell diversity and the emergence of pro-inflammatory CD4+CD28- T cell clonotypes may have implications for other autoimmune syndromes.
Keywords
Contributors
author
author
author
References
Document Type
REVIEW
Publication order reference
C.M. Weyand, Division of Rheumatology, Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.element-from-psjc-ae017372-83c4-391e-ae77-4656bc68baec
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.