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2007 | 67 | 4 | 389-397
Article title

Increase in the effectiveness of somatodendritic 5-HT-1A receptors in a rat model of tardive dyskinesia

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EN
The present study concerns responsiveness of pre- and postsynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-1A receptors in a rat model of tardive dyskinesia (TD). Vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) in rats are widely accepted as an animal model of TD. Results show that haloperidol injected at a dose of 1 mg/kg twice a day for 5 weeks elicited VCMs, which increased in a time dependent manner following the drug administration for 3-5 weeks. Tolerance was produced in motor coordination during the potentiation of VCMs. Exploratory activity in an open field and in an activity box decreased in haloperidol treated animals. The effects of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetraline (8-OH-DPAT; 0.5 mg/kg) were monitored 48-h after withdrawal from repeated administration of haloperidol. 8-OH-DPAT-induced locomotion was greater in haloperidol treated rats. 5-HT synthesis increased in haloperidol treated animals, while 8-OH-DPAT-induced decreases of 5-HT synthesis were greater in repeated haloperidol than repeated saline injected animals. The results suggest that an increase in the effectiveness of somatodendritic 5-HT-1A receptors may decrease the inhibitory influence of 5-HT on the activity of dopaminergic neurons to precipitate VCMs. The 5-HT-1A agonist may help to alleviate neuroleptic-induced TD.
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Volume
67
Issue
4
Pages
389-397
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ARTICLE
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N. Samad, Department of Biochemistry, Neurochemistry and Biochemical Neuropharmacology Research Laboratory, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270, Pakistan
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bwmeta1.element.element-from-psjc-17f9e5d6-083e-3907-a27b-0bec4cc60dfb
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