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2019 | 33 | 4 | 13-18
Article title

The evaluation of foot arch and the distribution of foot-to-ground contact forces in young football players as well as their impact on the occurrence of injuries

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EN
Abstracts
EN
Introduction The foot is an important element of the human motor system. It is a single mechanism of propulsion and amortisation. Sports people, football players in particular, are especially prone to limb loading. In this discipline, the first contact with the sport as well as training begin at a very young age. In order to prevent traumas and injuries among young players, it is important to assess their foot arch. Material and methods A group of 30 players aged 13-18 who played football at the Progres Sports Academy in Cracow and at the lower- and upper-secondary schools in Cracow under the patronage of Marcin Gortat were tested. The tests involved the podoscopic evaluation of both feet, the test of both feet on a tensometric mat and a survey. To assess the longitudinal foot arch, Clarke’s angle was applied in the authors’ own tests. The transverse arch was evaluated using the Wejsflog index. Results For the overwhelming majority of the persons tested, the most common type of longitudinal arch was flat foot. Only a scant minority had a tendency towards hollow foot. The most common injuries among the examined footballers included muscle pulling and tearing as well as sprains and overloading. Most players suffered injuries of thigh muscles, knee joints, tarsal joints and feet. Conclusions It was confirmed that there was a significant correlation between the intensity of training and the frequency of injuries.
Keywords
Year
Volume
33
Issue
4
Pages
13-18
Physical description
Dates
published
2019-12-30
Contributors
author
author
author
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.doi-10_5114_areh_2019_89822
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