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2019 | 76 | 5 | 885-893
Article title

The influence of olanzapine and aripiprazole on spatial memory of female rats exposed to stress in the perinatal period

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EN
Abstracts
EN
Cognitive functions, such as learning and memory, are instrumental in improving the patient’s quality of life. Commonly used antipsychotic drugs are also useful in depression treatment, and have a positive effect on spatial memory dysfunction caused by schizophrenia. Olanzapine (OLA) and aripiprazole (ARI) are known to have substantially different pharmacokinetics depending on sex, thus their therapeutic efficacy and dose of treatment may be different for males and females. The aim of the study was to assess whether dysfunction of spatial memory (Morris Water Maze - MWM) and locomotor activity (LA) improve in prenatally stressed rats (animal model of schizophrenia (AMS)) by OLA and ARI. OLA (0.5 mg/kg ip) and ARI (1.5 mg/kg ip) were administered to female Wistar rats (non-stressed control group (NSCG) and PSG). Single administration of ARI and OLA in the NSCG yielded no differences in spatial memory compared to the control group (C-NSCG), while OLA improved memory after 7 days of treatment compared to the C-NSCG. In the prenatally stressed group (PSG), an impairment of spatial memory by the drug was observed (vs. C-NSCG) after long-term treatment. Only chronic administration of ARI and OLA (PSG) improved spatial memory in female rats. Conclusion: Stress causes memory dysfunction in female rats. Chronic administration of ARI and OLA reverses this effect which can probably be associated with the mechanism of action of the drugs used (ARI/OLA). ARI acts as an agonist or antagonist mainly on D2 and 5-HT2A receptors, while OLA induces antagonist effects for these receptors.
Year
Volume
76
Issue
5
Pages
885-893
Physical description
Dates
published
2019-10-30
Contributors
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.doi-10_32383_appdr_110379
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