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2014 | 125 | 4A | A-149-A-154
Article title

Frequency Discrimination for Amplitude Modulated Sinusoidal Signals at High Carrier Frequencies

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EN
Abstracts
EN
The current study is a continuation of experiments presented by Sęk and Bukała (Acta Physica Polonica A 123, 1106 (2013)). The purpose of the present study was to investigate frequency discrimination of amplitude modulated high frequency carriers. Using 2AFC procedure, the subjects were presented with two observation intervals of which the first interval contained four pulses of the same high frequency signal (called SSSS), while in the second interval (called SHSH) the second and fourth pulses had higher frequencies values (i.e. shifted upwards by Δ f). The carrier frequency (in S pulses) was fixed and equal to 10 kHz. Modulation rates were equal to 100, 200, 337, 500, 600, 733, and 800 Hz. The value of the modulation rate was limited to keep all components of the sinusoidal modulation within one auditory filter (17% of the center frequency) centered at the carrier frequency. Two different types of modulation were used: a simple sinusoidal modulation with the modulation depth m set to 100%, and a logarithmic modulation with the modulation depth m set to 50 dB. Results indicate a strong relationship between frequency discrimination threshold and modulation type. The thresholds are significantly higher for logarithmic modulation in comparison to sinusoidal modulation. Amplitude modulation as well as logarithmic modulation applied to the high frequency carrier cause significant increase in the frequency discrimination threshold. For high frequency sinusoidal signal carriers (i.e. close to 10 kHz), frequency discrimination thresholds do not depend on amplitude modulation rates up to about 800 Hz. In general, the excitation pattern mechanism was a primary cue enabling frequency discrimination of modulated and unmodulated signals to compare with the mechanism based on the temporal fine structure. However, the excitation pattern was not the only mechanism responsible for the frequency discrimination.
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EN
Year
Volume
125
Issue
4A
Pages
A-149-A-154
Physical description
Dates
published
2014-04
References
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Document Type
Publication order reference
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.bwnjournal-article-appv125n4a29kz
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