PL EN


Preferences help
enabled [disable] Abstract
Number of results
2014 | 125 | 4 | 869-871
Article title

T1 and T2 Relaxation Times from Substantia Nigra in Parkinson's Disease and Control

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, and also other neurodegenerative disorders, is based on clinical examination. Many attempts are undertaken to find a test that could confirm this clinical diagnosis. Many hopes were attributed to magnetic resonance imaging but its importance remains obscure. The aim of this study was to compare T1 and T2 relaxation times from substantia nigra of patients with clinical diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and age-matched controls. A decrease of T2 (54.5 ± 1.4 ms vs. 58.0 ± 1.5 ms) in Parkinson's disease vs. control was found with confidence level of 5%. T1 did not differ significantly between Parkinson's disease and control (624 ± 17 ms vs. 614 ± 21 ms).
Keywords
EN
Publisher

Year
Volume
125
Issue
4
Pages
869-871
Physical description
Dates
published
2014-04
Contributors
author
  • Department of Nuclear Medicine and Magnetic Resonance, Bródno Regional Hospital, Warszawa, Poland
author
  • Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
  • Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
author
  • Department of Neurology, Medical University of Warszawa, Poland
References
  • [1] B. Haliwell, Ann. Neurol. 32 Suppl, 10 (1992), doi: 10.1002/ana.410320704
  • [2] S. Lehéricy, M.A. Sharman, C.L. Dos Santos, R. Paquin, C. Gallea, Movement Disord. 27, 822 (2012), doi: 10.1002/mds.25015
  • [3] P. Kosta, M.I. Argyropoulou, S. Markoula, S. Konitsiotis, J. Neurol. 253, 26 (2006), doi: 10.1007/s00415-005-0914-9
  • [4] J.M. Gorell, R.J. Ordidge, G.G. Brown, J.C. Deniau, N.M. Buderer, J.A. Helpern, Neurology 45, 1138 (1995), doi: 10.1212/WNL.45.6.1138
  • [5] I. Litvan, K.P. Bhatia, D.J. Burn, C.G. Goetz, A.E. Lang, I. McKeith, N. Quinn, K.D. Sethi, C. Shults, G.K. Wenning, Movement Disord. 18, 467 (2003), doi: 10.1002/mds.10459
  • [6] M.M. Hoehn, M.D. Yahr, Neurology 17, 427 (1967), doi: 10.1212/WNL.17.5.427
  • [7] A. Antonini, K.L. Leenders, D. Meier, W.H. Ortel, P. Boesiger, M. Anliker, Neurology 43, 697 (1993)
  • [8] E.M. Haacke, N.Y.C. Cheng, M.J. House, Q. Liu, J. Neelavalli, R.J. Ogg, A. Khan, M. Ayaz, W. Kirsch, A. Obenaus, Magn. Reson. Imaging 23, 1 (2005), doi: 10.1016/j.mri.2004.10.001
  • [9] K. Szlachta, K. Sadowski, R. Kuliński, J. Galazka-Friedman, A. Friedman, Acta Phys. Pol. A 121, 454 (2012)
  • [10] A. Wypijewska, J. Galazka-Friedman, E.R. Bauminger, Z.K. Wszolek, K.J. Schweitzer, D.W. Dickson, A. Jaklewicz, D. Elbaum, A. Friedman, Parkinsonism Relat. D 16, 329 (2010), doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2010.02.007
  • [11] A. Gröger, D. Berg, J. Neural. Transm. 119, 1523 (2012), doi: 10.1007/s00702-012-0873-0
  • [12] S.C.L. Deoni, Top. Magn. Reson. Imag. 21, 101 (2010), doi: 10.1097/RMR.0b013e31821e56d8
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.bwnjournal-article-appv125n403kz
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.