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2018 | 65 | 3 | 425-429
Article title

Chlamydial genomic MinD protein does not regulate plasmid-dependent genes like Pgp5

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Abstracts
EN
Chlamydia has a unique intracellular developmental cycle, which has hindered the single protein function study of Chlamydia. Recently developed transformation system of Chlamydia has greatly advanced the chlamydial protein's function research and was used to find that a chlamydial plasmid-encoded Pgp5 protein can down-regulate plasmid-dependent genes. It is assumed, that chlamydial genomic MinD protein has a similar function to Pgp5. However, it is unknown whether MinD protein regulates the same plasmid-dependent genes. We replaced pgp5 gene in the shuttle vector pGFP::CM with minD gene of C. trachomatis (CT0582) or C. muridarum (TC0871). The recombinant plasmid was transformed into plasmid-free organisms-CMUT3 and qRT-PCR was used to detect the transcription level of plasmid-encoded and -dependent genes in these pgp5 deficient organisms. As a readout, GlgA, one of the plasmid-regulated gene products was detected by immunofluorescence assay. After recombination, transformation and plaque purification, the stable transformants CT0582R and TC0871R were generated. In these transformants, the plasmid-dependent genes were up-regulated, alike in the pgp5 premature stop mutant and pgp5 replacement with mCherry mutant. GlgA protein level was also increased in all pgp5 mutants, including CT0582R and TC0871R. Thus, our study showed that genomic MinD protein had different function than Pgp5, which was useful for further understanding the chlamydiae.
Keywords
Publisher

Year
Volume
65
Issue
3
Pages
425-429
Physical description
Dates
published
2018
received
2017-11-17
revised
2018-06-27
accepted
2018-07-03
(unknown)
2018-09-15
Contributors
author
  • Department of Dermatovenereology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052, China
  • Key Laboratory of Hormones and Development (Ministry of Health), Tianjin Key Laboratory of Metabolic Diseases, Tianjin Metabolic Diseases Hospital and Tianjin Institute of Endocrinology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, China
author
  • Department of Dermatovenereology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052, China
  • Tianjin Neurological Institute, Key Laboratory of Post-neurotrauma Neuro-repair and Regeneration in Central Nervous System, Ministry of Education and Tianjin City, Tianjin 300052, China
author
  • Department of Dermatovenereology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052, China
  • Tianjin Neurological Institute, Key Laboratory of Post-neurotrauma Neuro-repair and Regeneration in Central Nervous System, Ministry of Education and Tianjin City, Tianjin 300052, China
author
  • Department of Dermatovenereology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052, China
  • Tianjin Neurological Institute, Key Laboratory of Post-neurotrauma Neuro-repair and Regeneration in Central Nervous System, Ministry of Education and Tianjin City, Tianjin 300052, China
author
  • Department of Dermatovenereology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052, China
  • Tianjin Neurological Institute, Key Laboratory of Post-neurotrauma Neuro-repair and Regeneration in Central Nervous System, Ministry of Education and Tianjin City, Tianjin 300052, China
author
  • Department of Dermatovenereology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052, China
  • Tianjin Neurological Institute, Key Laboratory of Post-neurotrauma Neuro-repair and Regeneration in Central Nervous System, Ministry of Education and Tianjin City, Tianjin 300052, China
author
  • Department of Dermatovenereology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052, China
  • Tianjin Neurological Institute, Key Laboratory of Post-neurotrauma Neuro-repair and Regeneration in Central Nervous System, Ministry of Education and Tianjin City, Tianjin 300052, China
author
  • Department of Dermatovenereology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052, China
  • Tianjin Neurological Institute, Key Laboratory of Post-neurotrauma Neuro-repair and Regeneration in Central Nervous System, Ministry of Education and Tianjin City, Tianjin 300052, China
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Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.bwnjournal-article-abpv65p425kz
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