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2012 | 59 | 2 | 289-292
Article title

Reduction of bilirubin ditaurate by the intestinal bacterium Clostridium perfringens

Content
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EN
Abstracts
EN
Bilirubin is degraded in the human gut by microflora into urobilinoids. In our study we investigated whether the bilirubin-reducing strain of Clostridium perfringens can reduce bilirubin ditaurate (BDT), a bile pigment of some lower vertebrates, without hydrolysis of the taurine moiety. C. perfringes was incubated under anaerobic conditions with BDT; reduction products were quantified by spectrophotometry and separated by TLC. Based on Rf values of BDT reduction products and synthetic urobilinogen ditaurate, three novel taurine-conjugated urobilinoids were identified. It is likely that bilirubin-reducing enzyme(s) serve for the effective disposal of electrons produced by fermentolytic processes in these anaerobic bacteria.
Publisher

Year
Volume
59
Issue
2
Pages
289-292
Physical description
Dates
published
2012
received
2011-11-19
revised
2012-01-17
accepted
2012-04-26
(unknown)
2012-04-27
Contributors
  • Institute of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic
  • Institute of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic
  • Institute of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic
  • Department of Organic and Nuclear Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic
  • Department of Organic and Nuclear Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic
author
  • Institute of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic
References
  • Fahmy K, Gray CH, Nicholson DC (1972) The reduction of bile pigments by faecal and intestinal bacteria. Biochim Biophys Acta 264: 85-97.
  • Gustafsson BE, Lanke L (1960) Bilirubin and urobilins in germfree, ex-germfree, and conventional rats. J Exp Med 112: 975-981.
  • Kotal P, Fevery J (1991) Quantitation of urobilinogen in feces, urine, bile and serum by direct spectrophotometry of zinc complex. Clin Chim Acta 202: 1-9.
  • Moscowitz A, Weimer M, Lightner A, Petryka ZJ, Davis E, Watson CJ (1970) The in vitro conversion of bile pigments to the urobilinoids by a rat clostridia species as compared with the human fecal flora; III. Natural d-Urobilin, synthetic i-urobilin, and synthetic i-urobilinogen. Biochem Med 4: 149-164.
  • Ridlon JM, Kang DJ, Hylemon PB (2006) Bile salt biotransformations by human intestinal bacteria. J Lipid Res 47: 241-259.
  • Sakai T, Watanabe K, Kawatsu H (1987) Occurrence of ditaurobilirubin, bilirubin conjugated with two moles of taurine, in the gallbladder bile of yellowtail, Seriola quinqueradiata. J Biochem 102: 793-796.
  • Vítek L, Ostrow JD (2009) Bilirubin chemistry and metabolism; harmful and protective aspects. Curr Pharm Des 15: 2869-2883.
  • Vítek L, Kotal P, Jirsa M, Malina J, Černá M, Chmelař D, et al. (2000) Intestinal colonization leading to fecal urobilinoid excretion may play a role in the pathogenesis of neonatal jaundice. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 30: 294-298.
  • Vítek L, Zelenka J, Zadinová M, Malina J (2005) The impact of intestinal microflora on serum bilirubin levels. J Hepatol 42: 238-243.
  • Vítek L, Majer F, Muchová L, Zelenka J, Jirásková A, Branny P, et al. (2006) Identification of bilirubin reduction products formed by Clostridium perfringens isolated from human neonatal fecal flora. J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci 833: 149-157.
  • Watson CJ (1953) The direct preparation of crystalline urobilin from bilirubin. J Biol Chem 200: 691-696.
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.bwnjournal-article-abpv59p289kz
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