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2004 | 51 | 3 | 747-755
Article title

Detection of circulating breast cancer cells in peripheral blood by a two-marker reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay.

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Abstracts
EN
The aim of this study was to use a two-marker assay for the detection of breast cancer cells circulating in patients' blood. We have applied a PCR-based methodology to follow up the possibility of the development of metastatic disease in stage I and II patients who had undergone curative surgery. Since the number of circulating cancer cells in peripheral blood is very low, the technique for their detection needs to be not only highly sensitive, but also very specific. The reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique may improve the sensitivity of breast cancer cell detection up to only a few cells per one million. The principle of the RT-PCR assay is to amplify a messenger RNA characteristic for breast epithelial cells in a blood sample. Since we do not expect such cells to be circulating in peripheral blood of healthy subjects, detection of the characteristic mRNA should indicate the presence of circulating breast cancer cells. We analyzed the usefulness of three mRNA markers: cytokeratin 19 (CK19), mammaglobin (hMAM) and β subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) for this test. Blood samples (112) were obtained from 55 patients, in stages I and II, with or without metastasis to regional lymph nodes (N0 or N1). We found that a two-marker assay increases the sensitivity of detection of breast cancer cells in comparison with a single-marker one. Combination of two tumor-specific mRNA markers, hMAM/CK19 or β-hCG/CK19, allowed the detection of circulating breast cancer cells in 65% of N1 patients and 38% of N0 patients. By comparison, the combination hMAM/β-hCG allowed the detection of circulating breast cancer cells in the blood of 68% of N1 patients and 46% of N0 patients. Addition of the third marker did not significantly increase the detection sensitivity.
Keywords
Publisher

Year
Volume
51
Issue
3
Pages
747-755
Physical description
Dates
published
2004
received
2004-04-19
revised
2004-04-26
accepted
2004-05-05
Contributors
  • Department of Molecular Biology, Cancer Center-Institute, Warszawa, Poland
author
  • Department of Molecular Biology, Cancer Center-Institute, Warszawa, Poland
author
  • Department of Molecular Biology, Cancer Center-Institute, Warszawa, Poland
  • Department of Breast Cancer and Reconstruction Surgery, Cancer Center-Institute, Warszawa, Poland
  • Department of Breast Cancer and Reconstruction Surgery, Cancer Center-Institute, Warszawa, Poland
  • Department of Molecular Biology, Cancer Center-Institute, Warszawa, Poland
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Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.bwnjournal-article-abpv51i3p747kz
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