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2003 | 50 | 1 | 205-210
Article title

Free radical scavengers can modulate the DNA-damaging action of alloxan.

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EN
Abstracts
EN
Alloxan can generate diabetes in experimental animals and its action can be associated with the production of free radicals. It is therefore important to check how different substances often referred to as free radical scavengers may interact with alloxan, especially that some of these substance may show both pro- and antioxidant activities. Using the alkaline comet assay we showed that alloxan at concentrations 0.01-50 μM induced DNA damage in normal human lymphocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Treated cells were able to recover within a 120-min incubation. Vitamins C and E at 10 and 50 μM diminished the extent of DNA damage induced by 50 μM alloxan. Pre-treatment of the lymphocytes with a nitrone spin trap, α-(4-pyridil-1-oxide)- N-t-butylnitrone (POBN) or ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one), which mimics glutathione peroxides, reduced the alloxan-evoked DNA damage. The cells exposed to alloxan and treated with formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and 3-methyladenine-DNA glycosylase II (AlkA), enzymes recognizing oxidized and alkylated bases, respectively, displayed greater extent of DNA damage than those not treated with these enzymes. The results confirmed that free radicals are involved in the formation of DNA lesions induced by alloxan. The results also suggest that alloxan can generate oxidized DNA bases with a preference for purines and contribute to their alkylation.
Publisher

Year
Volume
50
Issue
1
Pages
205-210
Physical description
Dates
published
2003
received
2002-10-09
revised
2003-01-22
accepted
2003-02-19
Contributors
  • Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
  • Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
  • Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
  • Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
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Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.bwnjournal-article-abpv50i1p205kz
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