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2002 | 49 | 2 | 377-385
Article title

Expression of p16 in sporadic primary uveal melanoma.

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EN
Abstracts
EN
Expression of p16 protein, intragenic mutations of CDKN2A and hypermethylation of CDKN2A promoter region in 41 sporadic primary uveal melanomas were studied. There were 2 cases of spindle cell B histological type, 11 of A + B and 28 of mixed type. All melanomas infiltrated sclera but in 28 cases infiltration was superficial while in 13 profound. In 7 cases the tumor infiltrated the optic nerve. Expression of p16 was studied by immunohistochemistry and recorded by assessment of the proportion of positive tumor cells and staining intensity. Results were expressed as staining index (IRS). Intragenic mutations were studied by PCR-SSCP followed by sequencing, while hypermethylation of the promoter region by CpG methylation assay. In 15% of cases less than 10% of melanoma cells were p16 positive, in 70% of cases less than 50% of cells, while in 7% more than 80% of cells stained for p16 (mean IRS for all cases was 4.87 ± 2.43). In B type the IRS was 8.5 ± 0.7, in A + B type 6.0 ± 2.1 and in the mixed type 4.17 ± 2.43 (differences statistically significant). In melanomas profoundly infiltrating sclera mean IRS was 4.16, while in those infiltrating optic nerve 3.71 (statistically not significant). Analysis of the intragenic mutations revealed in two patients a GAC/GAT substitution in codon 84 - a silent mutation. No hypermethylation of the CpG island of the p16 promoter region was found. In conclusion, we found that the degree of p16 expression is related to the histological type of tumor but not to the histological indicators of tumor invasiveness and that intragenic mutations and promoter hypermethylation are not major mechanisms of p16 inactivation in sporadic uveal melanoma.
Publisher

Year
Volume
49
Issue
2
Pages
377-385
Physical description
Dates
published
2002
received
2002-04-22
revised
2002-05-23
accepted
2002-06-2
Contributors
  • Department of Cancer Immunology, University School of Medical Sciences and GreatPoland Cancer Center, Poznań, Poland
  • Department of Cancer Immunology, University School of Medical Sciences and GreatPoland Cancer Center, Poznań, Poland
  • Department of Cancer Immunology, University School of Medical Sciences and GreatPoland Cancer Center, Poznań, Poland
  • Department of Cancer Immunology, University School of Medical Sciences and GreatPoland Cancer Center, Poznań, Poland
  • Department of Ophtalmology, College of Medicine, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland
  • Department of Ophtalmology, College of Medicine, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland
  • Department of Ophtalmology, College of Medicine, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland
  • Department of Clinical and Experimental Pathomorphology, College of Medicine, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland
  • Department of Cancer Immunology, University School of Medical Sciences and GreatPoland Cancer Center, Poznań, Poland
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Document Type
Publication order reference
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YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.bwnjournal-article-abpv49i2p377kz
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