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2011 | 83 | 10 | 568-570
Article title

Intrapancreatic Accessory Spleen Imitating a Pancreatic Neoplasm

Content
Title variants
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EN
Abstracts
EN
Accessory spleens are present in 10% of population and are formed during embryonic development. Besides the splenic hilum, the next most frequent localization of accessory spleens is the pancreatic tail. Intrapancreatic accessory spleens are usually diagnosed occasionally and make diagnostic difficulty because they imitate a pancreatic neoplasm. We present the case of a 61-year old woman with a mass in the pancreatic tail, diagnosed by computed tomography. The patient was operated with suspicion of neuroendocrine tumor. Postoperative histopathological examination revealed the intrapancreatic accessory spleen. We present possibilities of differential diagnosis.
Publisher

Year
Volume
83
Issue
10
Pages
568-570
Physical description
Dates
published
1 - 10 - 2011
online
21 - 12 - 2011
Contributors
author
  • Department of Oncologic and Reconstructive Surgery, M. Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Institute in Gliwice
  • Department of Tumor Pathology, M. Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Institute in Gliwice
  • Department of Radiodiagnostics, Oncology Center, M. Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Institute in Gliwice
  • Department of Oncologic and Reconstructive Surgery, M. Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Institute in Gliwice
author
  • Department of Oncologic and Reconstructive Surgery, M. Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Institute in Gliwice
References
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  • Arkadopoulos N, Athanasopoulos P, Stafyla V et al.: Intrapancreatic accessory spleen issues: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. J Pancreas 2009; 10(4): 400-05.
  • Kurmann A, Michel JM, Stauffer E et al.: Intrapancreatic accessory spleen misdiagnosed as a nonsecreting endocrine tumor: case report and review of the literature. Case Rep Gastroenterol 2010; 4: 210-14.[Crossref][PubMed]
  • Guo W, Han W, Liu J et al.: Intrapancreatic accessory spleen: A case report and review of the literature. World J Gastroenterol 2009; 15: 1141-43.[Crossref][WoS]
  • Takayama T, Shimada K, Inoue K et al.: Intrapancreatic accessory spleen. Lancet 1994; 344: 957-58.
  • Ota T, Tei M, Yoshioka A et al.: Intrapancreatic accessory spleen diagnosed by technetium-99m heat-damaged red blood cell SPECT. J Nucl Med 1997; 38: 494-95.
  • Kim SH, Lee JM, Lee JY et al.: Contrast-enhanced sonography of intrapancreatic accessory spleen in six patients. AJR 2007; 188: 422-28.
  • Ota T, Ono S: Intrapancreatic accessory spleen: diagnosis using contrast enhanced ultrasound. Brit J Radiol 2004; 77: 148-49.[Crossref]
  • Kim SH, Lee JM, Han JK et al.: Intrapancreatic accessory spleen: findings on MR imaging, CT, US and scintigraphy, and the pathologic analysis. Korean J Radiol 2008; 9: 162-74.[PubMed][Crossref][WoS]
  • Kim SH, Lee JM, Han JK et al.: MDCT and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-enhanced MR findings of intrapancreatic accessory spleen in seven patients. Eur Radiol 2006; 16: 1887-97.[Crossref][PubMed]
  • Lin J, Jing X: Fine-needle aspiration of intrapancreatic accessory spleen, mimic of pancreatic neoplasms. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2010; 134: 1474-78.
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.-psjd-doi-10_2478_v10035-011-0090-9
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