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2009 | 81 | 9 | 383-391
Article title

Neovascularization in the Region of Saphenofemoral Junction Following Babcock Excision of Great Saphenous Vein

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EN
Abstracts
EN
Recurrent varicose veins are an important problem in the surgical practice. They can be caused by neovascularization. New venous anastomoses, formed at the site of primary surgical intervention, can result in venous reflux and then recurrence of the disease.The aim of the study was to investigate whether there is a neovascularization at the site of saphenofemoral junction and if so, how common it is, in patients undergoing surgical treatment for varicose veins of the lower limbs.Material and methods. The study enrolled 60 patients: 43 women and 17 men. In all study subjects the region of saphenofemoral junctions was dissected, visualized collateral vessels and great saphenous vein were ligated and cut; the latter was dissected using Babcock method. Ultrasound imaging of the saphenofemoral junction was performed twice: 30 days and 6 months after the surgical procedure. We sough vessels that persisted after the primary procedure as well as vessels formed in the process of neovascularization.Results. Thirty days after the surgical procedure, we did not find any blood vessels in the study group that would suggest that the process of neovascularization took place. In 10 (16.7%) patients we found collaterals left in the region of saphenofemoral junction. Six months after the surgical procedure, small newly formed venules were found in 17 (28.3%) patients in the region of previous surgical intervention. Certain neovascularization was found in 12 (20%) patients and probable neovascularization in 5 (8.3%) of the study group.Conclusions. Six months after the surgical procedure small, tortuous veins appeared at the site of saphenofemoral junction. Their formation is inevitable and occurs irrespectively of completeness of the primary surgical procedure. Throughout six months of follow-up we did not find any evidence to support the assumption that neovascularization could be the cause of recurrent varicose veins.
Publisher

Year
Volume
81
Issue
9
Pages
383-391
Physical description
Dates
published
1 - 9 - 2009
online
4 - 9 - 2009
Contributors
  • Chair and Clinical Department of General and Gastroenterological Surgery in Bytom, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice
  • Chair and Clinical Department of General and Gastroenterological Surgery in Bytom, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice
author
  • Chair and Clinical Department of General and Gastroenterological Surgery in Bytom, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice
  • Chair and Clinical Department of General and Gastroenterological Surgery in Bytom, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice
author
  • Chair and Clinical Department of General and Gastroenterological Surgery in Bytom, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice
References
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Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.-psjd-doi-10_2478_v10035-009-0065-2
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