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2008 | 80 | 4 | 184-189
Article title

Evaluation of the Dependency Between the Claudication Distance Reported by the Patient and the Ankle-Brachial Index at Rest, and the Distance Covered on the Treadmill Test in Patients with Lower Limb Ischemia

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
Views concerning the dependency between the claudication distance and ankle-brachial index values are ambiguous.The aim of the study was to determine the correlation between the distance covered during the treadmill test and ankle-brachial index, and the distance covered during the treadmill test and claudication distance reported by the patient.Material and method. The study group contained 75 patients of both genders, above the age of 40 years, treated at the Vascular Disease Outpatient Clinic, diagnosed with one or both-sided intermittent claudication, and with an ankle-brachial index below 0.9. In all patients we evaluated the ankle-brachial index at rest, considering both lower limbs, as well as the claudication distance on the treadmill test (3.2 km/h, 12° gradient). We determined the distance traveled until the manifestation of pain (distance free of pain), and the distance until complete stop (total walking distance). Analysis always considered one (the worse) lower limb of the patient.Results. There was no correlation between the ankle-brachial index and distance covered during the treadmill test. However, there was a statistically significant dependency between the claudication distance reported by the patient, and that observed during the treadmill test. A moderate correlation was observed between the total walking distance and the claudication distance reported by the patient (r= 0.441, p=0.001).Conclusions. 1. The ankle-brachial index at rest should not be used as a measure of the intensification of lower limb ischemia symptoms in patients with intermittent claudication. 2. The claudication distance reported by the patient only moderately correlates with the total observed walking distance.
Publisher

Year
Volume
80
Issue
4
Pages
184-189
Physical description
Dates
published
1 - 4 - 2008
online
10 - 5 - 2008
Contributors
author
  • Chair and Department of General Surgery, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń
  • Chair and Department of General Surgery, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń
  • Chair and Department of General Surgery, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń
  • Chair and Department of General Surgery, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń
  • Chair and Department of General Surgery, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń
References
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  • Resnik HE, Lindsay RS, McDermott MM et al.: Relationship of high and low ankle brachial index to all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality: the Strong Heart Study. Circulation 2004; 109(6): 733-39.
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Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.-psjd-doi-10_2478_v10035-008-0022-5
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